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The SoWH Blog

Stay up to date on the latest Section HQ news, patient and practitioner education and member stories!

Meet Early-Professional, Carolyn Yates, DPT

My name is Carolyn Yates. I pursued a career in physical therapy because I thoroughly enjoy helping other people. I consider myself a natural caregiver and physical therapy was an easy decision. From caring for my friends during injuries or illness, to leading various sport teams as a captain or coach to taking care of young children, I always found myself gravitating towards helping others. I loved the idea of having a substantial amount of time with patients each week as opposed to the shorter amount of time that doctors and nurses get. I realized half of the draw to PT for me was that I would get to talk to my patients and make significant relationships and make significant impacts on people's lives. I love getting to know my patients. Personally, I am a very active person and think that trait also had an impact on my career path to physical therapy (PT). I've always been a passionate runner and nature lover. Getting to help other people reach their goals of being able to get back to their sport/activity of choice was a huge draw. Also, being able to relate with my patients about their trials and tribulations with being injured and desire to return to their activity/sport was a draw for me. Overall, I knew I wanted to be in a helping profession. I found PT through exploration of the helping medical fields and I am so happy I did. I truly feel blessed to have the job I do.

Early-Career Advice from Pelvic Health Physical Therapist, Nicole Cozean, PT, DPT, WCS, CSCS

How did you decide to pursue pelvic health physical therapy? What is your background? I hadn’t actually planned to specialize in pelvic health in physical therapy (PT) school or the first years after graduation.  My first interest in the area came in PT school when I was assigned the pelvis and pelvic floor for an anatomy project.  I was fascinated by the complexity of the region (and still believe a strong understanding of the underlying anatomy is crucial for a pelvic physical therapist).  About 15 years ago, Hoag Hospital asked me to create a pelvic health program. They allowed me to pursue a fellowship program with an experienced local therapist, and I was able to take amazing continuing education courses from some of the leaders in the field at that time.  

Tips for Improving Urge Incontinence | Bladder Health

Urinary urgency or urge incontinence happens when the bladder contracts when it is not supposed to and may result in subsequent leakage of urine. This can occur for different reasons. However, it can commonly be due to either overactive or under active pelvic floor muscles. Due to the connection with the pelvic floor muscles, Physical Therapists specializing in Pelvic Floor Dysfunction can help. They can use bladder retraining which is a technique to improve urinary urge incontinence by trying to improve bladder and pelvic floor function. It is best to be evaluated first by a medical professional to find out which category you fall in, as well as to rule out other possible causes.

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction is More Common than You Think and There is Something You can Do About It

Pelvic health physical therapy can be a difficult topic for many people to discuss. It can be embarrassing, confusing, and even painful. Society tends to discourage discussion of these topics, causing confusion and lack of awareness regarding what is or is not normal. The reality is that pelvic floor dysfunction is common and there is something we can do about it. As one of my professors once pointed out, “There is an entire aisle dedicated to adult pads and diapers in every Target, someone is buying them!” 

SoWH Treasurer Announcement

The Section on Women's Health Board of Directors would like to announce the resignation of our Treasurer of 5 years, Uchenna Cynthia-Awelle Ossai “UC” PT, DPT, CLT, WCS. UC has been a dynamic and integral member of our board, bringing her “swagger” and intellect to recent growth within our organization and her insightful point of view to issues including Diversity and Inclusion as well as education in the area of LGBTQ health and wellness. We congratulate UC on her service and wish her well as she pursues her professional passions!

A PT Student's Takeaways from 2019 APTA CSM Washington, D.C.

Imagine walking in from the rain and the cold, through a set of double doors and seeing a wave of people coming in and going out; individuals whizzing by you as they make their way to their designated location and having crowds of really smart and cool people all around you. Well, that was my experience on my first day heading into the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. for the 2019 Combined Sections Meeting, the nation’s largest physical therapy conference that is held every year. To say that attending this conference and then in some way having a small role in it, was overwhelming, is an understatement.

Key Factors That Limit Access to Physical Therapy Care

Hi, I'm Michelle Little. My parents were born in Colombia, South America and moved to the United States with dreams of a better life. They immigrated from an impoverished area, lacked a college education and with a very basic English vocabulary. Due to this sacrifice, they have always had very manual,  labor-intensive jobs. From a very young age, I knew what pain was because I witnessed my mother icing her hands and feet after a ten-hour shift. I now understand that my mother’s pain was in part caused by the physical requirements for her job and poor occupational accommodations. During all those years, my mother was never told about or referred to physical therapy, so she lived in fear that her body was weak and damaged. In my sophomore year of college, I had a knee injury that led to surgery and post-operative physical therapy. Going through physical therapy made me feel empowered, and I knew I had found my life’s passion. I wanted to educate and empower patients that had orthopedic pain like my mother, and improve the quality of life of my patients and their families.

“Just Relax?” Meeting with Trauma in the Physical Therapy Setting

In his seminal book “The Body Keeps the Score,” trauma expert Dr. Bessel van der Kolk states “the ability to feel relaxed in one’s body requires the emotional experience of safety.”  

Kudos to PT Advocate Achievement in 2018!

Reflecting back on 2018 and the numerous achievements accomplished this year. A permanent fix to the Medicare therapy cap was achieved after 20 years of temporary exceptions and implementation delays. Other important legislative and regulatory achievements, included enactment of comprehensive opioid legislation that increases awareness and access to nonpharmacological treatment options, enactment of the Sports Medicine Licensure Clarity Act to ensure physical therapists have liability insurance when working with teams across state lines, the elimination of functional limitation reporting, and the expansion of telehealth services in the Veterans Administration and Medicare Advantage. The Physical Therapy Interstate Licensure Compact continued to make progress, with the first licensure privilege being issued and compact legislation enacted in 21 states. These wins help advance the profession of physical therapy. Please join the effort to move physical therapy forward with the start of the 116th US Congress this January and become a grassroots advocate.  The 2019 Federal Advocacy Forum will take place Sunday, March 31-Tuesday, April 2 at the JW Marriott near the White House in Washington, DC. Registration and housing will open January 2019 and end March 18, 2019. 

Meet Briana Dillon, SPT

My initial interest in women's health was sparked by a conversation with a professor during my 1st year of DPT school. I was subsequently surprised and pleased to discover the APTA specialty Section on Women's Health. Researching the field provided insight into issues of pelvic floor pain and lymphedema and networking with clinicians in the field provided me with concrete examples of how physical therapy can positively impact the quality of life in this under-served population.

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