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The SoWH Blog

Stay up to date on the latest Section HQ news, patient and practitioner education and member stories!

Meet the PPSIG Board! (Pregnancy & Postpartum Physical Therapy Special Interest Group)

The Pregnancy & Postpartum Physical Therapy Group (PPSIG) is a SoWH community of professionals having a common interest in the evaluation, treatment, and wellness of pregnant and postpartum women. The PPSIG will provide a space where this community may meet, confer, and promote these interests through education, clinical practice, and research. 

Congratulations to the Newly Board-Certified Specialists in Women's Health Physical Therapy!

Please join the Section on Women's Health in congratulating the newly Board-Certified Clinical Specialists in Women's Health Physical Therapy, Class of 2019!

Meet Morgan Horne, SPT

I plan to practice in women's health PT in the future and plan to use the Pelvic Health Physical Therapy Level 1 course and the Fundamental Topics of Pregnancy & Postpartum course in order to broaden my evaluation of my patient's pelvic floor muscles and therefore get them back to their desired functional activities. I really have learned to love the area of women's health in school and think this niche is a growing part of physical therapy that is so essential for women to thrive at their maximal potential in all areas of life. Because of this passion that I get when thinking about this niche, I have decided to gear my future plans in the direction of women's health.

Meet Early-Professional, Carolyn Yates, DPT

My name is Carolyn Yates. I pursued a career in physical therapy because I thoroughly enjoy helping other people. I consider myself a natural caregiver and physical therapy was an easy decision. From caring for my friends during injuries or illness, to leading various sport teams as a captain or coach to taking care of young children, I always found myself gravitating towards helping others. I loved the idea of having a substantial amount of time with patients each week as opposed to the shorter amount of time that doctors and nurses get. I realized half of the draw to PT for me was that I would get to talk to my patients and make significant relationships and make significant impacts on people's lives. I love getting to know my patients. Personally, I am a very active person and think that trait also had an impact on my career path to physical therapy (PT). I've always been a passionate runner and nature lover. Getting to help other people reach their goals of being able to get back to their sport/activity of choice was a huge draw. Also, being able to relate with my patients about their trials and tribulations with being injured and desire to return to their activity/sport was a draw for me. Overall, I knew I wanted to be in a helping profession. I found PT through exploration of the helping medical fields and I am so happy I did. I truly feel blessed to have the job I do.

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction is More Common than You Think and There is Something You can Do About It

Pelvic health physical therapy can be a difficult topic for many people to discuss. It can be embarrassing, confusing, and even painful. Society tends to discourage discussion of these topics, causing confusion and lack of awareness regarding what is or is not normal. The reality is that pelvic floor dysfunction is common and there is something we can do about it. As one of my professors once pointed out, “There is an entire aisle dedicated to adult pads and diapers in every Target, someone is buying them!” 

Key Factors That Limit Access to Physical Therapy Care

Hi, I'm Michelle Little. My parents were born in Colombia, South America and moved to the United States with dreams of a better life. They immigrated from an impoverished area, lacked a college education and with a very basic English vocabulary. Due to this sacrifice, they have always had very manual,  labor-intensive jobs. From a very young age, I knew what pain was because I witnessed my mother icing her hands and feet after a ten-hour shift. I now understand that my mother’s pain was in part caused by the physical requirements for her job and poor occupational accommodations. During all those years, my mother was never told about or referred to physical therapy, so she lived in fear that her body was weak and damaged. In my sophomore year of college, I had a knee injury that led to surgery and post-operative physical therapy. Going through physical therapy made me feel empowered, and I knew I had found my life’s passion. I wanted to educate and empower patients that had orthopedic pain like my mother, and improve the quality of life of my patients and their families.

USA Weightlifting's Increased Involvement in Educating their Coaches and Lifters about Pelvic Health

Key Highlights   For the first time, USA Weightlifting is actively getting involved in educating their coaches and lifters about pelvic health.  On Thursday, December 6, Tamra Wroblesky gave an hour and a half interactive seminar to coaches and lifters about pelvic health, pressure regulation, hip and thoracic mobility, bowel and bladder regulation, all to improve performance under the bar.   This will be an uphill battle as there is poor awareness and education about pelvic health.  They have hired Tamra for their 2 international female camps (Barbados and Ohio) in 2019 due to the popularity of the first camp in Las Vegas last year. Check out Tamra's original Team USA article,  Supercharge Your Pelvis, which has  gained momentum in the weightlifting community and her latest report below!  

It’s Not Normal : My Drive to Learn More

I’m a wife, a mom of three little boys, and the owner of a private practice caring specifically for Women’s Health. I began my career out of Physical Therapy school in the acute care setting and following the birth of my first child I learned just how important and necessary pelvic health physical therapy (also referred to as pelvic floor physical therapy) is following delivery. At that time, there were no providers within 50 miles of my home, so I sought to change this. I developed and implemented a hospital-based, outpatient pelvic floor program after taking both OB courses through the Section on Women's Health (SoWH) as well as Pelvic Health Physical Therapy Level 1 and Level 2. Unfortunately, the hospital closed with a 30-day notice in January of 2018, prompting me to launch my own practice to continue caring for this patient population. The practice has been open since March of 2018 and has cared for over 150 patients to date.

How My Pregnancy & Childbirth Experience Set Me on a Path to Pursue Pelvic Health Physical Therapy

My interest in women’s health physical therapy first began when I was working as a rehab technician in a clinic with two pelvic floor therapists. My personal interest was piqued after my own experiences before, during, and after childbirth. Interested to learn more once I began physical therapy school, I spent time during my winter break in 2017 to shadow a women’s health specialist. I was delighted to observe how large of an impact patient education could make for the pelvic health patient population.

How I Created My Own Path to Pelvic Health Physical Therapy

My name is Anietie Ukpe-Wallace and I am currently in my final year of the University of St. Augustine’s FLEX DPT program. Before I even considered physical therapy (PT) school, I taught yoga for several years and have always had an interest in the pelvic floor and how those set of muscles could impact a person’s ability to move through a pose or limit the amount of movement in their hips or back. The muscles that cannot be visibly seen externally held a lot of mystery to me. Having gone through my own trials with my own pelvic floor from miscarriages to surgery and pregnancy to birth, this region of the body continued to be a mystery even then despite all of that “stuff” that I had happening down there. Sad to say, PT school did not discuss much on the pelvic floor other than a short lecture on pregnancy and when I discovered that I could become a physical therapist with a specialty in the pelvic floor, my interest was piqued, and I began to investigate how to go about that path. During my time in PT school, I have been lucky enough to have two professors with whom I was able to discuss my interest and desires about pursuing this specialty. In addition to offering me resources to learn more about it and advising me to start seeking out courses, they also offered me encouragement to pursue this field since it was still growing and there is a high demand for this specialty.

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